News

Dream of the Red Chamber - Rock and Flower

Sensory spectacle, synesthesia for the soul.  Just as calligraphy, painting, and poetry are the fusion arts of the literati; arias, dance and staging are melded into aesthetic magic...

LRCCS Faculty Professor Bright Sheng's new opera Dream of Red Chamber is now being performed live!  Purcharse tickets here for the San Francisco Opera House (performances in September):

Creative team of Dream: composer Bright Sheng (left) and director Stan Lai (right) 

Xiaobing Tang on Mao-era Propaganda Art

Xiaobing Tang 唐小兵   Helmut F. Stern Professor Modern Chinese Studies and Comparative Literature

Xiaobing Tang
唐小兵

Helmut F. Stern Professor
Modern Chinese Studies and
Comparative Literature

If the past is a challenging story to tell, it’s equally challenging to understand modern China “in a meaningful process of change and self-renewal and transformation,” says Tang, the Michigan professor. “The posters, in some ways, serve precisely that purpose.”
— http://www.macleans.ca/culture/a-future-that-never-was-in-china/

Click here to read the article in its entirety

Congratulations! Celebrating LRCCS Faculty Promotions

The following LRCCS Faculty Associates' promotions were finally approved by the Board of Regents.  Congratulations!

  • Benjamin H. Brose, associate professor of Chinese Buddhism, with tenure, LSA.
  • Mary Gallagher, professor of political science, with tenure, LSA.
  • Ming Xu, associate professor of natural resources and environment, with tenure, SNRE, and associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, without tenure, CoE.
  • Wang Zheng, professor of women’s studies, with tenure, and professor of history, without tenure, LSA.
Photo credit - Thomas Talhelm

Photo credit - Thomas Talhelm

For the full list of UM promotions, check The Record's website:

https://record.umich.edu/articles/regents-approve-faculty-promotions-1

 

Mary Gallagher on Sports in China

Mary Gallagher   LRCCS Director Professor, Political Science

Mary Gallagher

LRCCS Director
Professor, Political Science

Where's the passion? China soccer boom missing key ingredient

Originally published Sunday, May 15, 2016 by CTV News - Click here for full article

The educational system “leaves very little space or time for sports”, said Mary Gallagher, of the University of Michigan. “Will parents risk points on the gaokao for the chance to play soccer every day?”

Linda Lim on Chinese Exportation of Global Infrastructure

Linda Lim    Professor of Corporate Strategy and International Business  Stephen M. Ross School of Business

Linda Lim

Professor of Corporate Strategy and International Business
Stephen M. Ross School of Business

China's newest super export: global infrastructure

May 1st, 2016. InTheBlack. Original by Joseph Catanzaro

Professor Linda Lim, a China strategy expert at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, says the perceived risk of low-quality Chinese construction is largely a thing of the past. She says Chinese companies are now aware their reputation is on the line internationally.

Linda Lim on NPR: China's Consumer Market

Linda Lim    Professor of Corporate Strategy and International Business  Stephen M. Ross School of Business


Linda Lim

Professor of Corporate Strategy and International Business
Stephen M. Ross School of Business

LRCCS Faculty Linda Lim was recently featured in an NPR interview about how the PRC government wants to tap into its consumer market. 

NPR: Beijing has acknowledged the system needs to change. But almost anything it does invites a painful trade-off. Opening up banks to foreign competition means less money will flow into state-owned banks, many of which already have a lot of bad debt. Spending more money on social services means less money to prop up state-owned businesses, and that could mean layoffs. Lim says Beijing is trying to implement reforms without doing too much damage to entrenched interests with government connections.

LIM: So that’s a very difficult and delicate balance between the two. It should ideally take place in a gradual manner, and, in a way, if you rush these things too much you create a lot of dislocations and shocks.

Click here to listen to the original recording (4 minutes)