Special Presentations

Video: New Directions in Manchu Studies

The LRCCS Annual Conference Series kicked off last weekend (May 6-8) at the UM Law School.  This year's topic was "New Directions in Manchu Studies."  

In this short video, Kicengge (aka Cheng Zhi, 承志) gives an introduction to the conference in Manchu, Sibe (his native language, a dialect of Manchu), and finally in English.  Kicengge is an associate professor of International Liberal Arts at Otemon Gakuin University in Osaka, Japan.  

Honoring Robert F. Dernberger

Robert F. Dernberger, director of CCS from 1983-1986 and again from 1991-94, passed away in March of this year.  To honor his long and distinguished career in Chinese economics, LRCCS is hosting a symposium titled "China's Economy Today: The New Normal and Old Challenges."  Many of his former students and colleagues will be speaking at the panel held on Friday, October 30th at R2220 Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

Registration will be open until October 16th; more info can be found on the LRCCS website.

Below is his retirement memoir written by the University of Michigan Board of Regents in 1995:

Regents’ Proceedings, May 1995, p323:

Robert F. Dernberger, professor of economics, will retire from active faculty status on May 31, 1995, after a most productive career in teaching and research.

A native of Michigan, Professor Dernberger learned Chinese while serving in the U.S. Army from 1950-53. He earned his B.A degree (1955), his M.A degree in Far Eastern studies (1956), his M.A. degree in economics (1958) at the University of Michigan, and his Ph.D. degree in economics (1965) at Harvard University. He was an assistant professor at the University of Chicago from 1963-68. Professor Dernberger joined the faculty of the University of Michigan as an associate professor of economics in 1968 and was promoted to professor in 1974. He served two terms as director of the Center for Chinese Studies: i 1983-86, and more recently in 1991-94.

Professor Dernberger is one of the world’s foremost experts on the Chinese economy. His teaching and research have centered on the field of comparative economic systems, with emphasis on the distinctive mechanisms that have operated in China under communism. He has served as editor of Economic Development and Cultural Change, as chair of the Social Science Research Council, and as president of the Association of Comparative Economic Studies. He has been a member of more than ten research delegations to the People’s Republic of China, and has served on a number of panels, councils, and committees focused on China.

An active participant in departmental and university affairs, Professor Dernberger has been associate chair of the Department of Economics and a member of the Senate Assemblyo He is currently a senior faculty associate of the William Davidson Institute. Professor Dernberger’s scholarly writings include numerous contributions to journals and volumes dealing with Chinese development and the functioning of Chinese communism. In recent years, as China’s economy has evolved toward greater reliance on markets, he has turned more toward issues of transition in the Chinese economy. Most recently, he has been working on an ambitious project, “China in Time and Space.”

The Regents now salute this distinguished economist for his dedicated service by naming Robert F. Dernberger professor emeritus of economics.
— http://um2017.org/faculty-history/faculty/robert-f-dernberger/memoir


LRCCS Distinguished Visitor Lecture by Alexa Lam

Monday, April 20, 2015 @4pm

Michigan League - Vandenberg Room (second floor)

Reception to follow.

The Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies (LRCCS) welcomes Alexa Lam, the Inaugural LRCCS Distinguished Visitor. Ms. Lam recently stepped down as Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission (SFC), where she was the principal architect of increasing integration between the PRC and global (including Hong Kong) capital markets, oversaw the regulation of the Hong Kong retail investment products market, and managed the SFC’s policies on international engagement. Before joining the SFC, Ms. Lam practiced corporate and commercial law in New York, Chicago, and Hong Kong for over 20 years.

During Ms. Lam's two-week visit to the University of Michigan, she will guest-lecture in several classes at the Michigan Law School and Ross School of Business, and she will interact with faculty and students from various U-M schools and departments.

LRCCS Occasional Lecture Series - Donald Clarke

Anti Anti-Orientalism, or Is Chinese Law Different?

Anti Anti-Orientalism, or Is Chinese Law Different?

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Room 1636 School of Social Work Building

1080 South University

12 noon to 1:00pm

Donald Clarke

Professor of Law

George Washington University Law School

Some scholars of what is conventionally called the Chinese legal system believe that it is so different from Western legal systems that it should not be analyzed using the same terms, and perhaps should not be called a “legal system”. Other scholars critique this view on the grounds that it is ethnocentric and Orientalist. I critique the critique on the grounds that it methodologically excludes even the possibility of finding China (or anywhere) to be genuinely different, and thus blinds us to the possibility of radically different ways of organizing society.

Donald Clarke is a professor at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., where he specializes in modern Chinese law, focusing particularly on corporate governance, Chinese legal institutions, and the legal issues presented by China's economic reforms. He has previously been on the law faculties of the University of Washington School of Law and the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, and has been a visiting professor at Duke Law School, New York University School of Law, and the UCLA School of Law. In addition to his academic work, he founded and maintains Chinalaw, the leading internet listserv on Chinese law, and writes the Chinese Law Prof Blog. He was educated at Princeton University (A.B.) and the University of London (M.Sc.), and received his law degree (J.D.) from Harvard Law School, where he was a member of the Harvard Law ReviewHe has served as a consultant on Chinese law matters to a number of organizations, including the Financial Sector Reform and Strengthening Initiative (FIRST), the Asian Development Bank, and the Agency for International Development. He is a member of the New York bar and the Council on Foreign Relations. 

2014 LRCCS Annual Conference: Building State Capacity in China and Beyond, October 17-18

This conference brings together  scholars who study China and regions beyond China to examine the central issue of state capacity building in the developing world. What are some new dimensions of state capacity building broadly in the twenty-first century and specifically in China, as the country ascends to a middle-income status? How do changes in political and bureaucratic structures influence economic development and vice-versa? How will growing corruption, expansion of law, and new methods of communication affect state power? How is the Chinese state adapting to new challenges of governance? Can existing theories of state building explain problems in China? In turn, how can China’s reform experience challenge and inform our understanding of state building in the developing world?     McDowell Hall   Room 1225 South Hall   Michigan Law School   701 South State Street ▪ Ann Arbor, Michigan      Free and open to the public.

This conference brings together scholars who study China and regions beyond China to examine the central issue of state capacity building in the developing world. What are some new dimensions of state capacity building broadly in the twenty-first century and specifically in China, as the country ascends to a middle-income status? How do changes in political and bureaucratic structures influence economic development and vice-versa? How will growing corruption, expansion of law, and new methods of communication affect state power? How is the Chinese state adapting to new challenges of governance? Can existing theories of state building explain problems in China? In turn, how can China’s reform experience challenge and inform our understanding of state building in the developing world?

McDowell Hall
Room 1225 South Hall
Michigan Law School
701 South State Street ▪ Ann Arbor, Michigan

Free and open to the public.

Friday, October 17, 2014 

9:00 am                      Welcome remarks

9:00 – 10:30 am        Theme (A): Dimensions of State Capacity Building 

Chair: John Padgett
Discussant: Jean Oi
Presenter: Stephen Krasner
Presenter: Eric Thun

10:30 – 10:45 am      Break

10:45 – 1:00 pm        Theme (B): Corruption & Anti-Corruption

Chair: Jean Oi
Discussant: Melanie Manion
Presenter: Edmund Malesky
Presenter: Yuhua Wang
Presenter: Dan Hough

1:00 – 2:30 pm          Break

2:30—3:25 pm          Address by Kenneth Lieberthal, followed by Q&A Session

                                  China's Reform Goals: Necessary Changes in State Capacity

3:25—3:30 pm          Break 

3:30—5:00 pm        Theme (C):  Dynamics of Ideas and Communication

Chair: Benjamin Van Rooji
Discussant: Vivienne Shue
Presenter: Andrew Mertha
Presenter: Danie Stockmann

Saturday, October 18, 2014

9:00–11:30 am             Theme (D):  Interaction of State & Market 

Chair: Arun Agrawal
Discussant: Barbara Stallings
Presenter: John Padgett
Presenter: Kellee Tsai
Presenter: Yuen Yuen Ang

11:30—1:00 pm      Break

1:00–3:15 pm          Theme (E): Law & State Capacity

Chair: Edmund Malesky
Discussant: Kathryn Hendley
Presenter: Mary Gallagher
Presenter: Nicholas Howson
Presenter: Benjamin Van Rooji

3:30—5:00 pm          Concluding Round-Table Discussion

Mary Gallagher (moderator)
Arun Agrawal (discussant)
Melanie Manion (discussant)
Vivienne Shue (discussant)
Barbara Stallings (discussant)

Symposium on Prospects and Challenges in US-China Relations, October 16, 2014

An Inaugural Naming Event of the Kenneth G. Lieberthal and Richard H. Rogel Center for Chinese Studies

All events listed here are free and open to the public.

4:00 p.m.   Symposium on US-China Relations 
Location: Rackham Building, 915 E. Washington St., Amphitheatre, Fourth Floor

Live streaming link:  http://ummedia05.miserver.it.umich.edu/itsComm/ccs/its.html

Panel Discussion: “Contemporary China: Today and Tomorrow”

Introductions: Professor Mary Gallagher, Director of the Center for Chinese Studies

Moderator: Kenneth Lieberthal, Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy and Global Economy and Development, Brookings Institution

Panelists:

Daniel Rosen: Founding Partner of the Rhodium Group, Visiting Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs

Dr. Elizabeth Economy (PhD '94): C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Alastair Iain Johnston (PhD '93): The Governor James Albert Noe and Linda Noe Laine Professor of China in World Affairs at Harvard University.

Ambassador J. Stapleton Roy: Founding Director Emeritus and currently Distinguished Scholar of the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

5:00 p.m.   Q&A

5:45 p.m.   Performance by 6ixwire Project (violinist Xiang Gao, BM '95, MM '97; erhuist Cathy Yang) with pianist Matthew Brower, DMA '13

6:00 p.m.   Reception
Location: Rackham Building, 915 E. Washington St., Assembly Hall, Fourth Floor