Michigan/LRCCS faculty assess Hong Kong protests (updated December 2014)

Mary Gallagher Director, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies Associate Professor of Political Science

Mary Gallagher

Director, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies

Associate Professor of Political Science

What Do Hong Kong's Protests Mean For China?

by Nick Robins-Early, The Huffington Post, October 4, 2014

Beijing will not back down on this. They will see this as a crucial test of their leadership and authority over Hong Kong and it’s highly unlikely that they’ll budge on the big issues.

What Hong Kong's Protests Mean for Mainland China

by Claire Groden, The New Republic, September 29, 2014

The concern is that people in the mainland will start asking, ‘Well, why can’t we have that?’

Louisa Lim Visiting Professor of Journalism Communication Studies

Louisa Lim

Visiting Professor of Journalism

Communication Studies

Scenes from Occupy Hong Kong's Last Stand 

The New Yorker, December 12, 2014

For Anson Chan, who headed the city’s civil service from 1993 to 2001, the past seven weeks have been sobering. ‘We see the Hong Kong that we love, the Hong Kong that we had a part in building up, crumbling before our very eyes....’

The Thugs of Mainland China

The New Yorker, October 8, 2014

The idea that triads could be patriotic was first raised, in 1984, by Deng Xiaoping. The chief of China’s Public Security Bureau, Tao Siju, caused uproar in Hong Kong, in 1993, when he echoed those sentiments, bluntly stating, ‘As for organizations like the triads in Hong Kong, as long as these people are patriotic, as long as they are concerned with Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability, we should unite with them.’

Louisa Lim stops by The Colbert Report to discuss Hong Kong, October 1, 2014

 

Hong Kong People!

Op-ed, The New York Times, September 29, 2014

Hong Kong has not yet become another Tiananmen, but the fact they are being spoken of in the same breath shows how little Beijing cares what the rest of the world thinks.